Harris Tobias' Fiction

August 21, 2010

Interview with Author STEVE LINDAHL

Filed under: Author Interviews — harristob @ 7:08 pm

SOME THINGS THAT MATTER TO AUTHOR STEVE LINDAHL

Why should I read your book?

When I wrote Motherless Soul I tried to create a page turner with interesting characters.  I thought people would read it to enjoy the story.  But at the same time I wanted to stimulate thought about possibilities for what happens to us after we die.  In the end I think I’ve achieved both those goals plus one that I consider the most important of all.  My book has been a comfort to people experiencing tragedy.  I don’t know exactly why, but I know it’s true.

What do you like about writing?

I like acting and writing because both art forms give me the chance to lead fictional lives that, at their best, have as much emotion as our real lives.  And that emotion is completely under my control.
Do you listen to music while you write, or do you require total and utter silence?

I listen to new age most of the time, but I switch to hard rock when I’m writing scenes that require tension.

How did you become involved with the subject or theme of your book?
My book has multiple themes.  The ones that stick out the most are The American Civil War, Mother and Daughter relationships, and reincarnation.
The Civil War is particularly interesting to me because I have a great grandfather who fought on the union side and won the National Medal of Honor.  He wrote an autobiography that has been inspirational to me.
The interest in mother and daughter relationships comes from two people I love – my wife and my daughter.  I spent most of my life watching their relationship.
Reincarnation is a concept I’ve always been interested in.  I’m a Christian, but I don’t believe there is a conflict between the concepts.  It just takes a little longer to get to heaven if you come back a few times.

Where did your love of books/storytelling/reading/writing/etc. come from?

I’ve always loved reading, but the first time I remember trying to write seriously happened in eighth grade.  A friend of mine and I wrote a play together.  His writing was much more polished than mine was.  I remember wishing I could write better and thinking that this was something I was willing to work at long enough to become good.

What was the hardest part of writing this book?

Portions of Motherless Soul take place during the American Civil War.  I worked very hard to get my facts straight about that time period and about the two battles in the book – Gettysburg and The Battle of the Wilderness.

What did you enjoy most about writing this book?

I loved developing the relationship between Stephie and Michael.  It is both awkward and improper at times.  I think that makes it real and exciting.  It also drives home the concept that we are influenced by what has happened to us in previous lives.

Are there misconceptions that people have about your book?  If so, explain.

There are people who won’t read a book with any paranormal concepts.  I don’t think they understand how real the characters in those books can be when they are written with care.

Are you a full-time or part-time writer?  How does that affect your writing?

Technically I’m a part-time writer because I have a day job as a computer programmer.  But I’m constantly thinking about my stories as I’m experiencing the rest of my life.  So I guess by that more liberal definition, I’m a full-time writer.

How do you feel about ebooks vs. print books and alternative vs. conventional publishing?

The content of the books I read are much more important to me than the medium.  My home is filled with book shelves, so it is clear that I like the feel of traditional books.  But that doesn’t keep me from enjoying audio books or reading on my laptop.

What do you think is the future of reading/writing?

People need fiction and good books provide involvement for readers that TV and film can’t.  So the mediums may change, but story telling will not.

How do you find or make time to write?

I have a need to write.  I would be living a lie if I denied it.  No matter what else is going on in my life I find time for my writing.  I get up in the middle of the night, every night, to work on my stories.

What are some ways in which you promote your work?  Do you find that these add to or detract from your writing time?

I promote through traditional ways such as readings and signings.  I also promote through the internet with my blog (www.stevelindahl.blogspot.com) and my website (www.stevelindahl.com).  I was fortunate to find a publisher, All Things That Matter Press, with a high level of expertise concerning methods of promotion over the web.  I’ve learned a lot since Motherless Soul has come out.  It has been a wonderful experience.

What is your role in the writing community?

I’ve been an active part of our local writing community for years.  I was a co-founder and associate editor of The Crescent Review years ago.  We published the early works of a number of writers who are now fairly well known, including Madison Smartt Bell, Jill McCorkle, Sharyn McCrumb, and Andre Dubus III, among others.

What projects are you working on at the present?

I am working on a sequel to Motherless Soul.  I’ve kept the character of Glen Wiley (the hypnotist) and given him an entirely new set of people to work with.  It’s been fun and is starting to develop in ways I hadn’t imagined.  I’m loving the process.

Who’s your best/worst critic?

My wife is my best critic.  But I am also in an excellent writers group.  I depend on them a great deal. 

Will the “mechanical” standards of writing hold? Grammar, sentence structure, etc.? Does it matter? Why or why not?

There will always be standards, although they will change over time.  In the end what matters with fiction comes down to two things – A strong story and great characters.
What’s your favorite art form (excluding writing). Why?
I love many art forms.  My wife is a pastel artist.  I enjoy going to her shows and helping her perfect her work, as she does with mine.  I also love acting and singing.  Both of those art forms can give me an emotional jolt similar to what I get when I am writing.

An Interview with Author Ken Weene

Filed under: Author Interviews — harristob @ 4:11 pm

SOME THINGS THAT MATTER TO AUTHOR KENNETH WEENE

1) Why should I read your book?

Since your children or grandchildren will undoubtedly be reading Memoirs From the Asylum in school in years to come, don’t you want to be ahead of the curve? How can you pass on the chance to read a book that has repeatedly been called one of the best books of the year – and not just by the author and his relatives?

2) Are you a cat or a dog person?
Although we had many dogs when we were younger, I have never thought of myself as a dog person. My totem animal has always been the moose, but my friends and family usually refer to me as a friendly bear – except when around salmon, when I can get quite greedy.
3) Do you listen to music while you write, or do you require total and utter silence?

It truly varies. When I listen to music, I like classical, country-western, and some cross-cultural music – interestingly much of it from India and Pakistan. Sometimes I like to have the TV in the background; it’s the equivalent of white noise – totally meaningless.

4) How did you become involved with the subject or theme of your book?
Memoirs From the Asylum is at one level about mental health, which has been my life’s work. At another level it is about fear, freedom and existential choice: that is some of the basic substance of my life. My previous novel, Widow’s Walk, is about faith and the conflict between religion and spirituality and between love and responsibility: again basic strata of  my and most readers’ lives.

5) What do you think most characterizes your writing?
I am passionate about my characters. I want to understand them, to listen to them, and to recreate their voices with fidelity. Most of them I like, and I become quite upset when bad things happen to them. Of course there are others whom I dislike and wish had never come into the lovely worlds of my books.

6) What was the hardest part of writing this book?
I had a difficult time getting the denouement of Memoirs From the Asylum underway. I knew how the book ended, but I needed an event to make things change., a tipping point. Then a friend of mine, playwright Jon Tuttle, mentioned an event about which he wanted to write a play. A circus elephant had gone berserk and killed somebody. The town in which this happened tried and executed the elephant. The image of the berserk elephant was what I needed.

7) What projects are you working on at the present?
I have one book ready to go – written and first edit done. It is a conspiracy novel that takes place in New York just before 9/11. It is also a book about life goals.

Currently I’m writing a novel that is very different. It is primarily a simple story written in a poetic voice; however it is also partly a work of science fiction. At the bigger level that book is about sex, procreation, and the worth of life.

8) List the three questions you’d ask your favorite author over lunch.

I’d ask Kurt Vonnegut: What does writing mean to you? Do you care if people read your books? Who’s paying for lunch?
My answers if I were asked those questions:

I write to make people think and feel; therefore I need them to read what I have written. Let’s split the bill.

9) What’s your most memorable (not necessarily your favorite) childhood memory?

Read Memoirs From the Asylum and you will find some of my childhood projected onto the narrator. His mother is modeled on mine. I would particularly direct the reader to the dance classes; they are right out of my childhood. 

10) Here is a really weird, but fun one…what trash item did you see that inspired you to write a story. In one of my stories I found a whole character when I saw a manikin head on a dumpster.

Did you create this question just for me? Memoirs From the Asylum is about life in a dumpster. What is a psychiatric hospital, especially a state hospital, but a giant human trash heap? One goal of this novel is to get readers to see the flotsam and jetsam of society as human and meaningful instead of seeing them as some kind of subhuman creatures or even worse as caricatures.

You can learn more about me and my work at
HYPERLINK “http://www.authorkenweene.com/http://www.authorkenweene.com/

I have trailers for both Widow’s Walk and for Memoirs From the Asylum.

The Memoirs trailer is:
HYPERLINK “http://vidego.multicastmedia.com/player.php?p=nqm74a8khttp://vidego.multicastmedia.com/player.php?p=nqm74a8k

The Widow’s Walk trailer is:
HYPERLINK “http://vidego.multicastmedia.com/player.php?p=wbgzb2ykhttp://vidego.multicastmedia.com/player.php?p=wbgzb2yk

August 11, 2010

An Interview with Author Ken Weene

Filed under: Author Interviews — harristob @ 6:46 pm

SOME THINGS THAT MATTER TO AUTHOR KENNETH WEENE

1) Why should I read your book?

Since your children or grandchildren will undoubtedly be reading Memoirs From the Asylum in school in years to come, don’t you want to be ahead of the curve? How can you pass on the chance to read a book that has repeatedly been called one of the best books of the year – and not just by the author and his relatives?

2) Are you a cat or a dog person?

Although we had many dogs when we were younger, I have never thought of myself as a dog person. My totem animal has always been the moose, but my friends and family usually refer to me as a friendly bear – except when around salmon, when I can get quite greedy.
3) Do you listen to music while you write, or do you require total and utter silence?

It truly varies. When I listen to music, I like classical, country-western, and some cross-cultural music – interestingly much of it from India and Pakistan. Sometimes I like to have the TV in the background; it’s the equivalent of white noise – totally meaningless.

4) How did you become involved with the subject or theme of your book?

Memoirs From the Asylum is at one level about mental health, which has been my life’s work. At another level it is about fear, freedom and existential choice: that is some of the basic substance of my life. My previous novel, Widow’s Walk, is about faith and the conflict between religion and spirituality and between love and responsibility: again basic strata of  my and most readers’ lives.

5) What do you think most characterizes your writing?

I am passionate about my characters. I want to understand them, to listen to them, and to recreate their voices with fidelity. Most of them I like, and I become quite upset when bad things happen to them. Of course there are others whom I dislike and wish had never come into the lovely worlds of my books.

6) What was the hardest part of writing this book?

I had a difficult time getting the denouement of Memoirs From the Asylum underway. I knew how the book ended, but I needed an event to make things change., a tipping point. Then a friend of mine, playwright Jon Tuttle, mentioned an event about which he wanted to write a play. A circus elephant had gone berserk and killed somebody. The town in which this happened tried and executed the elephant. The image of the berserk elephant was what I needed.

7) What projects are you working on at the present?

I have one book ready to go – written and first edit done. It is a conspiracy novel that takes place in New York just before 9/11. It is also a book about life goals.

Currently I’m writing a novel that is very different. It is primarily a simple story written in a poetic voice; however it is also partly a work of science fiction. At the bigger level that book is about sex, procreation, and the worth of life.
8) List the three questions you’d ask your favorite author over lunch.

I’d ask Kurt Vonnegut: What does writing mean to you? Do you care if people read your books? Who’s paying for lunch?

My answers if I were asked those questions:

I write to make people think and feel; therefore I need them to read what I have written. Let’s split the bill.

9) What’s your most memorable (not necessarily your favorite) childhood memory?

Read Memoirs From the Asylum and you will find some of my childhood projected onto the narrator. His mother is modeled on mine. I would particularly direct the reader to the dance classes; they are right out of my childhood.

10) Here is a really weird, but fun one…what trash item did you see that inspired you to write a story. In one of my stories I found a whole character when I saw a manikin head on a dumpster.

Did you create this question just for me? Memoirs From the Asylum is about life in a dumpster. What is a psychiatric hospital, especially a state hospital, but a giant human trash heap? One goal of this novel is to get readers to see the flotsam and jetsam of society as human and meaningful instead of seeing them as some kind of subhuman creatures or even worse as caricatures.

You can learn more about me and my work at

http://www.authorkenweene.com/

I have trailers for both Widow’s Walk and for Memoirs From the Asylum.

The Memoirs trailer is:

http://vidego.multicastmedia.com/player.php?p=nqm74a8k

The Widow’s Walk trailer is:

http://vidego.multicastmedia.com/player.php?p=wbgzb2yk

June 3, 2010

The Swindler

“The Swindler” by Michelle Kaye Malsbury
Publisher: All Things That Matter Press
ISBN 978-0-9844219-4-7
Genre: suspense, thriller, mystery, fiction
Description
How easy is it for an investment broker to deceive clients? Very, particularly if his personal hero is Bernie Madoff. Skip Horowitz, along with his old pal A.J., has created what they believe is a foolproof scheme using commodities trading, bookmaking, and various other businesses as covers. Their plan has served them well for decades, surviving the scrutiny of government agencies lacking solid proof to support any allegations of wrongdoing. But luck can’t hold forever…or can it? Catherine O’Reilley, newly sponsored in the high-risk world of investment strategy by Skip Horowitz, is about to find out.
About the Author
Michelle Malsbury was born and raised in Champaign, Illinois. Currently she resides in Florida. She holds a Bachelors of Science in Business Management and a Masters Degree in Business Management. She has just completed her first year of doctoral studies in the discipline of Conflict Resolution and Peace Studies with high hopes of helping to build nations and sustain peaceful interactions around the globe.

The Review:  “The Swindler”  – an incredibly fast-paced roller-coaster ride through the world of illegal commodities trading with enough sun and sin to heat up every reader’s day (and night.)  Michelle Malsbury at her finest!  A definite must read!
Marilou Trask-Curtin, Author of “In My Grandfather’s House:
A Catskill Journal”

Purchase Information:
http://www.amazon.com/Swindler-Michalle-Kaye-Malsbury/dp/0984421947/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1272463500&sr=1-1

Author Links:

http://www.michellemalsbury.com

http://www.facebook.com/michellekayemalsbury

May 6, 2010

A Hitch In Twilight–by Vic Fortezza

Filed under: Author Interviews — harristob @ 10:53 pm

A Hitch in Twilight is a compilation of stories of The Twilight Zone-Alfred Hitchcock variety. Most involve ordinary people in extraordinary circumstances. Lucifer appears in two. Most are set in New York, particularly Brooklyn. They are designed to make entertain and to foster thought. They are 20 tales of Warped Imagination.

Excerpt

Beneath the Boardwalk, somewhere along the Brighton Beach side, leeward of a dune formed by the bitter winter winds, lay a long, narrow cardboard box around which rats were scurrying. There was a restless, troubled murmuring within it. Suddenly the flaps flew aside and a man inside sprang to a sitting position like a jack-in-the-box, casting pages of a newspaper, his blankets, aside in his wake. He fought to regain his breath, muttering angrily, fearfully.
His attention was snared by a click. His paroxysm had been vanquished. His senses had never seemed so alive. He peered beyond the dune, past the small gap between its peak and the underside of the Boardwalk. A cigarette lighter flickered briefly, illuminating a hard though handsome face that featured a thick, neatly-trimmed black beard.

Review

Vic Fortezza writes about the trials and tribulations of life. Be it fiction or reality he captivates his audience with hard-boiled characterizations that catapult readers through drama and intrigue, at times with a touch of humor. Vic’s words flow with strength – he tells it like it is – through the eyes of a powerful, seasoned writer. By the time you’ve read the last page of A Hitch in Twilight, you’ll feel like you’ve lived each story.
Victoria Valentine, Editor Skyline Review.

To purchase A Hitch in Twilight, go here:

Learn all about Vic at his website, read his mainstream stories, free:
Follow Vic’s blog: Selling Books on the Streets of Brooklyn:

May 2, 2010

Short Story–Peaceful Intent

Filed under: Author Interviews — harristob @ 9:35 pm

Peaceful Intent

by Harris Tobias

10/10

It was a shock to see how small they were, a great relief too. All that ridiculous posturing by the military in the months leading up to the landing wound up making everyone look foolish. The generals fretting over the alien’s superior technology, bracing for Armageddon. All the media hype about invaders from outer space. The country on heightened alert. And for what, the Fleb? Give me a break. they turned out to be fodder for late night comics.

The message from the aliens was clear enough: “After a journey of many years, the Fleb are coming, in peace, to make contact with our Earth brothers.” That was all the message said. Just 19 words. It was enough to set the entire planet into a tizzy. The message was analyzed and dissected endlessly in the media. What did they mean by “a journey of many years?” Were they being deliberately vague about where their home world was? How many years exactly? Did they travel at light speed or slower or faster as some predicted? And how about that little parenthetical phrase, “in peace”? Just tossed in there like an afterthought, thrown in to appease us. And the term “Earth brothers”? Those two words alone spawned an entire cottage industry of speculation. Did they look like us? Descendants? The whole world held its collective breath as the big day arrived.

Looking back on it now, all our fears were misplaced. It was the Fleb who should have been afraid of us. When it finally landed, the Fleb ship was no bigger than a good sized mail box with the diameter of a dinner plate. In other words, squat and small. Disappointingly small. Ridiculously small.

When the Fleb finally emerged from their ship they turned out to be not much bigger than terrestrial mice and just as cute. They looked so adorable standing there at attention in their tiny space suits. The world switched from fear and apprehension to cuddly, I-want-one-cute in an instant. The people of Earth opened their hearts to the Fleb, our visitors from afar and bid them welcome. You could hear the sighs as the generals, politicians and the public relaxed. We had been preparing for a worst case scenario— an alien invasion complete with death rays and a B-movie script. What we got was an oversized bird feeder piloted by cuddly beings four inches tall. We could squash the Fleb in our bare hands if we had to. The generals high fived each other and said things like, “better safe than sorry,” and “semper fi.”

The dignitaries, gathered for the historic “first contact” ceremony, were also embarrassed by their guest’s diminutive size. An iconic photograph taken at the time shows the Vice President on all fours accepting a tiny scroll from the aliens and presenting them with a neatly folded American flag. Unfortunately, the flag was the size of the entire space ship and far too heavy for the Fleb to lift. That picture has done more to make us look like the stupid humans we are than almost anything else. To be fair, the tiny aliens proved diplomatically awkward in every situation. The only thing that might have been worse was if it was the President giving the oversized flag to the Fleb. Fortunately the president had been kept in seclusion by the secret service until the threat posed by the Fleb could be properly assessed.

The media was disappointed that the alien’s command of English was limited to the 19 words of their initial greeting and soon grew tired of hearing it repeated over and over. Linguists, trying to decipher the Fleb language, made little headway. Without being able to interview the alien crew or turn them into celebrities, the media soon lost interest and moved on to more relevant matters. Except for the growing market in cuddly alien dolls, pajamas and bedding, the Fleb gradually disappeared from the public mind. The general feeling was, they’re cute, they’re not a threat, let’s move on.

The Fleb turned out to be exactly as advertised— a peaceful, nonaggressive race of space-farers. Too boring for the military to take seriously but perhaps still useful. Shortly after the welcoming ceremony, the military took charge of the aliens and whisked them out of sight for their own protection. The Fleb crew was separated from their ship and kept in a special enclosure in a secure location where biologists could study their behavior. Physicists and space scientists were dying to study the craft itself. The alien engineering, their propulsion, communication and navigation systems were all of special interest. The scientists insisted on access. They made such a fuss that finally the president had to order the military to hand over the alien ship for study.

How the aliens felt about having their ship taken from them and disassembled can only be guessed at as they soon took ill and began dying one by one. Some biologists attributed the alien deaths to foreign pathogens, others to their diet noting the aliens had not eaten much since being separated from their ship and its supplies. But rumors of euthanasia still persist.

Having dead aliens proved a boon to the science community who, to their credit, felt queasy experimenting on live ones. Having dead aliens to examine helped our academics avoid the messy business of having to murder a few of them. More than one scientist quit the program claiming that is exactly what was done. The dead Fleb were carefully dissected, photographed, cataloged and preserved in little jars for posterity. Their tiny space suits were carefully examined and reverse engineered. Of the 20 original Fleb, twelve were still alive when they managed to cut a hole in their enclosure and escape— four males and eight females vanished without a trace.

The military hushed up the escape for as long as they could but their incompetence soon came to light as did their inhumane treatment. After a series of articles exposing Fleb-gate, several low ranking soldiers were punished and the public was roused from its slumber to blog about it.

Fortunately, much had been learned about Fleb biology before they disappeared. None of it encouraging. Biologists provided the generals with some alarming statistics: The gestation period for the female Fleb was about 16 days and the average litter was eight or nine offspring. The tiny spacesuits proved to be a sham as the Fleb were perfectly adapted to breathe our atmosphere.

The result of the Fleb escape is either an infestation or an invasion, depending on how one looks at it. Today it is estimated that there are well over four billion Fleb in the U.S. alone, living amongst us, in our walls, our schools, our laboratories, observing us, learning from us for purposes unknown. What’s more, they no longer trust us and may very well be plotting against us. Our high handed treatment having destroyed any chance of mutual cooperation. And since they no longer trust us, and probably never will, we have to accommodate ourselves to their presence. It’s our own fault, we should just suck it up and learn to live with them. You have a mouse that steals the bait? It’s a Fleb. Something in the walls the cat can’t catch? It’s a Fleb. You feel like you’re being watched/ you are. It’s an unfortunate situation but one of our own making. Once again, the generals are concerned. As for the American public, they don’t have to know.

April 29, 2010

Human Trial 2

Filed under: Author Interviews — harristob @ 6:19 pm

Timothy Stelly’s HUMAN TRIAL (2009, All Things That Matter Press) and HUMAN TRIAL II: ADAM’S WAR (2010, All Things That Matter Press), present the tale of a ragtag group of survivors of an alien-launched thermal war that has destroyed nearly all human amd animal life on the planet. HUMAN TRIAL raised the question, What happens when all that remains of the world is fear, distrust and desperation? HT II follows the group on a cross-country trek that results in a final, frenzied battle against the extra-terrestrial invaders.
Reviews for part one of Timothy Stelly’s sci-fi noir thriller, Human Trial, have been positive. Readers and critics from the U.S. and Canada have praised the book for its grittiness and frightening tenor.
“…Superb. It’s as if I’m one of the 10 going through the same trials they are. I can hardly wait to read the next installment.”—T.C. Matthews, author oif What A Web We Weave
“The book scares me because of the possibility of this happening in our future and how we will handle it. Scary. Deeply thought out…Timothy definitely has his own voice and it is powerful.” —Minnie Miller, author of The Seduction of Mr. Bradley
“Human Trial was a well written, well thought out book with plenty of biting, satirical social, religious and racial commentary interspersed within the dialogue. The drama, and the pathos, were nonstop, and I never knew what to expect next.” –Brooklyn Darkchild, author of This Ain’t No Hearts and Flowers Love Story, Pt. I & II
“[This] story has been haunting me-reminds me of Octavia Butler’s ‘Parable of the Sower’…Stelly’s work haunts me two years after I read it.”
–Evelyn Palfrey, author of Dangerous Dilemma and The Price Of Passion
“4 out of 5 stars. I felt the echoes of other notable science fiction novels, including “Parable of the Sower” by Octavia Butler, “Lucifer’s Hammer” by Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle, and “Manhattan Transfer” by John E. Stith. Timothy Stelly creates a believable milieu of small-town America being turned upside down by forces beyond comprehension, and puts the reader right in the middle of the action.—Claxton Graham, Amazon.com review
“Human Trial is at once a sci-fi story, a look at the psychology of survival, and a timely cautionary tale regarding current environmental woes; our individual and collective responsibility to one another and to the planet…It is an entertaining and intricate story that can be read and enjoyed along with the likes of Mitchener, King, or Peter Straub. Stelly intuitively knows what everyday people will do to survive and how their interactions with each other will sound.”—Brian Barbeito, Columnist Useless-Knowledge.com and author of Fluoride And The Electric Light Queen

Timothy N. Stelly is a poet, essayist, novelist and screenwriter from northern California. He describes his writing as “socially conscious,” and his novel, HUMAN TRIAL, is the first part of a sci-fi trilogy and is available from Amazon.com,  and in e-book format.
HUMAN TRIAL II: ADAM’S WAR (All Things That Matter Press) is scheduled for release in MAY, 2010.  Stelly also has a short story included in the AIDS-themed anthology, THE SHATTERED GLASS EFFECT (2009) . His story SNAKES IN THE GRASS, Is a tale of love, betrayal and its sometimes deadly consequences.

April 23, 2010

A Felony of Birds

Filed under: Author Interviews — harristob @ 1:04 pm

This exciting novel is told in three interlocking stories that take the reader from the jungles of Costa Rica to the wilderness of Wisconsin’s Northern forests. It’s one heart pounding adventure after another for a new kind of female hero–an intelligent, sensitive Chippewa woman with a mind of her own.
Native American Fish & Wildlife Investigator, Rhoda Deerwalker, finds herself in one harrowing adventure after another. Starting with her rookie assignment to observe a bird smuggling case in rural Wisconsin to her stumbling upon a terrorist plot in the deep woods. She matures and grows and ultimately re-evaluates her career and herself. She retreats to the familiar surroundings of the reservation only to get involved in yet another misadventure—a desperate attempt to shut down a corrupt Indian casino that is exploiting her people. The three stories all mesh together as Rhoda grows, finds romance, and wrestles with who she is and what she wants out of life.

Available from Amazon Kindle and in print

April 22, 2010

They Plotted Revenge Against America by Abe March

Filed under: Author Interviews — harristob @ 8:21 pm

They Plotted Revenge Against America by Abe March

An American attack on Baghdad leaves heartbroken and angry survivors. Two families, one Muslim and one Christian, are wiped out; their young adult progeny are determined to avenge the loss of their loved ones. David Levy, an Israeli Secret Service agent with a grudge of his own, knows just how to tap into the vulnerabilities that grief leaves, and organizes the training of select individuals whose desire for vengeance is strong enough to consider a deadly covert mission in America. Trainees will learn to blend in, disappear in the multicultural mix of the US, and then infest the food and water supply with a deadly flu virus capable of mutating and infecting the human population. The antidote–if it works–will only be revealed under strict demands. Some team members come to realize that they could ultimately be responsible for millions of innocent deaths. Their actions could break the stalemate between the Israelis and Palestinians–or bring on unparalleled tragedy.

Excerpt (page 148):
…Now she expected to endure the same fate at the hands of the security police, as she would have expected in Russia. She bit her lip. Her face took on a determined look. No, she would not give them what they want and they would not break her. Without her knowing it, someone had been sitting in the room observing her. She was startled when the person said,
“How did you come to know David Levy?”
“Who’s to say I know David Levy?”
“Are you denying it?”
“I simply want to know who is saying that I know him. And why was I abducted?”
“I’m asking the questions. You will answer them.”
“I am not required to answer any of your questions. You have kidnapped me and brought me here by force. And why must I remain blindfolded. Are you afraid to show your face?”
“I ask you again, how do you know David Levy?”
“Why do you want to know?”
“You impertinent sow.” He slapped her across the face. Her head snapped back like whiplash. The stinging of the slap was nothing compared to the fury she felt. If only I could get my hands on that person, he would never slap me again, she thought…

Purchase They Plotted Revenge Against America at Amazon or from All Things That Matter Press.

For more information about Abe March, visit his website or his Amazon Profile page. For more information about All Things That Matter Press, visit their website.

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